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You are one step away from significantly improving your sleep
Made in USA - top quality
30 day money back guarantee
60,000 of grateful customers
99% Customer Satisfaction rate
You are one step away from significantly improving your sleep
Made in USA - top quality
30 day money back guarantee
60,000 of grateful customers
99% Customer Satisfaction rate

Shut. Your. Mouth.

The key to a more healthful life is simple: close your mouth, and breathe through your nose.

Let’s talk about your breathing

As humans, we give a lot of thought to how we eat, drink, exercise, bathe, and brush our teeth. But when’s the last time you thought about how you breathe? If you’re like most people, you’ve probably never given it much thought. This is highly concerning given that how we breathe has a direct impact on nearly every aspect of our health.  

 

Sadly, most of us do not breathe properly: we spend our days and nights breathing through our mouths. Once we start mouth breathing, it’s almost impossible to stop. Fortunately, SomniFix Strips help curb that bad habit and encourage nose breathing instead. This unlocks the pathway to great sleep, strong oral health, and a more healthful life.

Mouth Breathing

Mouth breathing is extremely dangerous

When our mouths fall open, our respiratory airways narrow.1 This makes efficient breathing difficult and inhaling sufficient airflow almost impossible, as upper airway resistance during mouth breathing is 2.5x higher than nasal breathing.2 This decreases minute ventilation and tidal volume.3

 

Because we are unable to breathe efficiently, we begin to hyperventilate and exhale too much CO2. This leads to a state of lowered oxygenation and nitric oxide production in our blood, meaning high risk of cardiovascular and cognitive illnesses.4,5

 

An open mouth is the leading cause of snoring

With our airways narrowed, we begin snoring. InBreath, James Nestor’s New York Times Bestseller, he had his nostrils blocked for 10 days and experienced a 4,500% increase in his snoring by the end of the experiment.6


For those with sleep apnea who use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), mouth breathing is the leading cause of CPAP failure and non-adherence.7

 

Along with a myriad of other issues

Mouth breathing also wreaks havoc on our oral microbiome. An open mouth results in the rapid evaporation of moisture, leading to a saliva deficit.6 In turn this leaves the body highly susceptible to cavities, coated tongue, bad breath, sore throats, and increased risk of sinus infections, among other things.8

 

Thankfully, nose breathing combats mouth breathing

The realities of modern life - increased stress, sedentary lifestyle, lack of fitness, and processed foods in our diet - have disrupted our natural breathing response, turning many of us into chronic mouth breathers. Thankfully, the effects of mouth breathing are reversible and just as mouth breathing begets mouth breathing, nose breathing begets nose breathing.6 

Thankfully, nose breathing combats mouth breathing

The realities of modern life - increased stress, sedentary lifestyle, lack of fitness, and processed foods in our diet - have disrupted our natural breathing response, turning many of us into chronic mouth breathers. Thankfully, the effects of mouth breathing are reversible and just as mouth breathing begets mouth breathing, nose breathing begets nose breathing.6 

Thankfully, nose breathing combats mouth breathing

The realities of modern life - increased stress, sedentary lifestyle, lack of fitness, and processed foods in our diet - have disrupted our natural breathing response, turning many of us into chronic mouth breathers. Thankfully, the effects of mouth breathing are reversible and just as mouth breathing begets mouth breathing, nose breathing begets nose breathing.6 

Thankfully, nose breathing combats mouth breathing

The realities of modern life - increased stress, sedentary lifestyle, lack of fitness, and processed foods in our diet - have disrupted our natural breathing response, turning many of us into chronic mouth breathers. Thankfully, the effects of mouth breathing are reversible and just as mouth breathing begets mouth breathing, nose breathing begets nose breathing.6 

Thankfully, nose breathing combats mouth breathing

The realities of modern life - increased stress, sedentary lifestyle, lack of fitness, and processed foods in our diet - have disrupted our natural breathing response, turning many of us into chronic mouth breathers. Thankfully, the effects of mouth breathing are reversible and just as mouth breathing begets mouth breathing, nose breathing begets nose breathing.6 

Nose Breathing

The first line of defense

Nose breathing filters, warms, and humidifies inhaled air, acting as the body’s first line of defense against allergens and pathogens. The mucus and cilia inside the nose are designed to block these pathogens from entering the respiratory airway and causing illness. This primes the air for respiration.

 

Plus, with the mouth closed the oral environment is fortified, protecting the gums, teeth, and microbiome.

 

Optimized airflow for better health

Beyond protecting you, nose breathing ensures efficient breathing and sufficient airflow by reducing collapsibility during sleep.9It facilitates a more regulated breathing rhythm during sleep by increasing minute dilation and tidal volume.3


As a result, this balances CO2-O2 exchange and boosts Nitric Oxide production - a vasodilator that relaxes the blood vessels to lower blood pressure. These two actions in concert can improve cardiovascular and cognitive health.10,11

 

Bring silence back into the bedroom

The number one cause of snoring? You guessed it, mouth breathing. Switching to nose breathing at night has been shown to reduce snoring by 72% on average.12


Plus, for CPAP users, nose breathing at night not only diminishes snoring, it also dramatically boosts CPAP compliance. The rate of compliance for nose breathers is 71%, while the rate of compliance for mouth breathers is 30%.7

Better breathing starts with SomniFix

Using SomniFix Strips at night helps to curb mouth breathing and get you back in the habit of nose breathing instead. This provides a wealth of short and long term benefits.

Silent Nights

Reduced snoring means better sleep for both you and your partner.

Better Oral Health

Protect your teeth, gums, and microbiome from cavities and disease.

Restorative Sleep

Nitric oxide production helps reduce blood pressure and aid with recovery.

More Daytime Energy

Rebalancing your O2-CO2 levels leads to more efficient oxygen exchange.

Better Mornings

No more morning dry mouth, nasal congestion or grogginess.

Sleep Longer

Experience less wakeful periods and a deeper, longer sleep.

Citations

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8542125/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621092
  3. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/arrd.1985.132.5.972
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690313/
  5. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/dementia-and-the-brainbreathing-connection-2161-0460-1000e135.php?aid=82713
  6. Nestor, James. Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. Penguin Publishing Group, 2020
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15486389/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26802697/
  9. (https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/22/5/827.long
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1438331/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
  12. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT02738255

Citations

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8542125/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621092
  3. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/arrd.1985.132.5.972
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690313/
  5. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/dementia-and-the-brainbreathing-connection-2161-0460-1000e135.php?aid=82713
  6. Nestor, James. Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. Penguin Publishing Group, 2020
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15486389/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26802697/
  9. (https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/22/5/827.long
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1438331/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
  12. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT02738255

Citations

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8542125/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621092
  3. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/arrd.1985.132.5.972
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690313/
  5. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/dementia-and-the-brainbreathing-connection-2161-0460-1000e135.php?aid=82713
  6. Nestor, James. Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. Penguin Publishing Group, 2020
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15486389/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26802697/
  9. (https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/22/5/827.long
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1438331/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
  12. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT02738255

Citations

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8542125/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621092
  3. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/arrd.1985.132.5.972
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690313/
  5. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/dementia-and-the-brainbreathing-connection-2161-0460-1000e135.php?aid=82713
  6. Nestor, James. Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. Penguin Publishing Group, 2020
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15486389/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26802697/
  9. (https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/22/5/827.long
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1438331/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
  12. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT02738255

Citations

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8542125/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621092
  3. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/arrd.1985.132.5.972
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690313/
  5. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/dementia-and-the-brainbreathing-connection-2161-0460-1000e135.php?aid=82713
  6. Nestor, James. Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. Penguin Publishing Group, 2020
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15486389/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26802697/
  9. (https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/22/5/827.long
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1438331/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
  12. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT02738255

Citations

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8542125/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621092
  3. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/arrd.1985.132.5.972
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690313/
  5. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/dementia-and-the-brainbreathing-connection-2161-0460-1000e135.php?aid=82713
  6. Nestor, James. Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. Penguin Publishing Group, 2020
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15486389/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26802697/
  9. (https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/22/5/827.long
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1438331/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
  12. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT02738255

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